Four Letter Nerd

4LN Book Review – Kubrick’s Game, by Derek Taylor Kent

Summary from the Amazon: “What if Stanley Kubrick left behind more than just his classic films? What if he also left behind an elaborate puzzle cleverly buried within his films, which would lead the player toward a treasure that could change the course of human history?”

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To be honest, I was slightly hesitant to start this book.  I mean, I have seen a majority of Kubrick’s films, but I was not an Kubrick junkie (do Kubrick fans have a nickname? I will try a few out throughout this review).  I also usually have a pretty good idea what I am getting myself into book-wise.  Generally, I like to do some research on the book before I buy it – what can I say… I’m cautious.  However, having received an advanced reader copy, I dove in feet first (I know headfirst is proper form, but I’m not a great swimmer).

Kubrick’s Game fits squarely into the unique genre that Ernest Cline’s Ready Player One made so popular.  I’m not entirely sure there is name for it, maybe adventure/thriller, but it involves a high-stakes puzzle laid out by a genius at the top of their craft, and includes life/world changing reward (also, Spielberg gets referenced).  All in all, it’s sort of like the Da Vinci Code for pop culture geeks.  The main difference that Kubrick’s Game has with Ready Player One is that the puzzle is laid out by Stanley Kubrick and involves almost all of his biggest blockbusters (most notably Lolita, Dr. Strangelove, 2001, and A Clockwork Orange).

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Derek Taylor Kent

When most books have the phrase “page-turner” emblazoned on the cover, I generally take it with a grain of salt.  That being said, Kubrick’s Game is legitimately a page-turner, and I am not even a Kubritch.  The puzzle the Kubrick leaves behind is inSANEly detailed, and while it starts innocuously enough, the stakes get higher and higher.  After finishing the story, I can’t imagine how much time and effort went into developing Kubrick’s puzzle, but I imagine it was quite a lot.

The book centers of Shawn, an autistic film student, his former child-actor friend Wilson, and Sami Singh.  I really like that the author’s main protagonist was autistic.  It was interesting seeing Shawn work through the puzzle, while also working through his own obstacles throughout the course of the book.  Along the way, Shawn and his cohorts face multiple trials that test not only the bonds of friendship, but their resiliency.  The dialogue held my attention pretty much the entire time, and the shadowy organization trying to steal the prize is sufficiently malevolent.

What made this book even more enjoyable was the fact that I had no idea what was going to happen from page to page.  That’s not necessarily rare, as I generally try to just enjoy the flow of the story, but this book was particularly mysterious.  Again, I would like to emphasize that I am not Kubro by any stretch of the imagination.  I have seen a handful of his movies throughout my life – never more than once or twice – and I still had an awesome time reading this book.  Kudos to Mr. Kent for writing an enjoyable adventure for both Kubrickians and us lay persons alike.

Kubrick’s Game was written by Derek Taylor Kent, who previously wrote the middle-school series Scary School, and is available everywhere as of September 26, 2016.  I encourage everyone – from people looking for a good fall read to legitimate Kubriphiles – to head down to the their local bookstore/online store and pick up their copy today!

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Cam Clark

Cam is a husband, father, and a fan of many things. In college, he wrote his senior thesis on Mythological, Philosophical, and Theological Themes in Star Wars, and now spends his days causally specializing in Star Wars, Tolkien, and cubical work. No relation to Bill Clark.

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